Rajaraam

Tony Nader, MD, PhD, MARR
Consciousness – The Foundation of Health, Happiness, and Long Life
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Dr. Nader received his M.D. degree from the American University of Beirut. His Ph.D. is in the area of Brain and Cognitive Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and he completed post-doctoral work as a Clinical and Research Fellow in Neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.
Dr. med. Rainer Picha

Dr. med. Rainer Picha, Austria
A Disease-Free Society — Is it Possible?
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Rainer Picha, MD, senior consultant in cardiology from Austria; former Assistant Director, Department of Cardiology of the State Hospital in Graz, Austria; researcher at Maharishi Vedic University in Vlodrop, Netherlands, since 1996. Dr. Picha is now Chairman of International Maharishi AyurVeda Foundation, overseeing all Maharishi AyurVeda activities worldwide.
Padma Bhushan Vaidya Devendra Triguna

Padma Bhushan Vaidya Devendra Triguna, India
Ayurveda – The Prevention Oriented Health Care
President of All India Ayurvedic Congress; recipient of “Padma Shri” & “Padma Bhushan” award for his contribution to Ayurveda.
Prof. Dr. Subhash Ranade

Prof. Dr. Subhash Ranade, India
Ayurveda Propagation Worldwide
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One of the foremost experts on Ayurveda. He is leading academician and physician in the field of Ayurveda. Chairman International Academy of Ayurved, Pune, India.
Dr. med. Walter Mölk

Dr. med. Walter Mölk, Austria
Ayurveda, a Foundation for Integrative Medicine
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Director International College of Perfect Health, The Netherlands; founder Austrian Society for Ayurvedic Medicine (1986).
Padmashri Ram Harsh Singh

Padma Shri Prof. Ram Harsh Singh, India
Shifting Paradigms of Ayurvedic Education in Global Perspective
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Life Time Distinguished Professor, Banaras Hindu University; Formerly Professor-Head & Dean, Faculty of Ayurveda, BHU and Vice Chancellor, RAU, Jodhpur.
Ashtavaidya Divakaran Mooss

Ashtavaidya E.T. Divakaran Mooss
Chairman and Chief Physician at Ashtavaidyan Thaikkattu Mooss, Aatma Ayurvedic Hospital, Thrissur,Kerala,India, Chief Consulting Physician at Keraleeya Ayurveda Samajam Shoranur, and at PNNM Ayurveda Medicial College.
Prof. Anant Darshan Shankar

Padma Shri Prof. Anant Darshan Shankar, India
Structure and logic underlying the Ayurvedic knowledge system
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Vice-Chancellor, TransDisciplinary University (TDU), Bangalore.
Prof. Bhushan Patwardhan

Prof. Bhushan Patwardhan, PhD, FAMS, India
Integrative Approaches For The Future: Ayurveda, Genomics and Epigenetics
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Professor, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences and Director, Center for Integrative and Complementary Health Savitribai Phule Pune University.
John Hagelin

John Hagelin (PhD Harvard), USA
Maharishi Vedic Medicine is ultra-modern, cutting-edge medicine — Unified Field Based Medicine
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President, Maharishi University of Management, renowned quantum physicist, Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy at MUM, and President of the Global Union of Scientists for Peace.
Bevan Morris

Bevan Morris, PhD, USA
Summary of highlights of the Congress
International President of Maharishi Universities of Management, USA
Prof. Gunvant Yeola

Prof. Gunvant Yeola, MD, PhD, India
Ayurveda for cognitive and behavioral disorders
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Professor and Head, Department of Kayachikitsa, Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Ayurved and Research Center, Pune; Director – International Academy of Ayurved (IAA).
Dr. Sunanda Ranade

Dr. Sunanda Ranade, India
Concept of Immunisation in Ayurveda
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Ayurvedic gynaecologist and nutritionist. Since the past 40 years she is the Vice Chairman of International Academy of Ayurved, Pune, India and is working in the field of Ayurveda and Yoga.
Professor Gerard Bodeker

Professor Gerard Bodeker, University of Oxford, UK
Ayurvedic dietary approaches in combatting NCD’s
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Chair Global Initiative For Traditional Systems (GIFTS) of Health, Oxford, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, UK, Dept. of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York.
Vaidyaraj Sunil B. Patil

Vaidyaraj Sunil B. Patil, India
Ideal Panchakarma Center, Charaka’s view
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Founder and president of Vanoushadhi Vidhyapeeth, Kolhapur, India. Editor of Vanoushadhi Magazine and author of eight books on Ayurveda. Received numerous national and international awards.
Dr. Keith Wallace

Dr. Keith Wallace, USA
Microbiom and Ayurveda
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Founding President, and currently Trustee, Maharishi University of Management, Co-Dean College of Perfect Health, Professor and Chairman, Department of Physiology and Health, and author of three books.
John Fagan, Ph.D.

John Fagan, PhD Cornell Univ., USA
Consciousness Based Health Care: modulating gene expression to achieve system-wide balance and integration through the Ayurvedic modality, Transcendental Meditation
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International Director for Food Purity, Safety and Security, Professor of Molecular Biology, Maharishi University of Management, USA. Exec. Dir. Earth Open Source, USA & EU.
Robert H. Schneider

Robert H. Schneider, MD, FACC, USA
Mind over Aging: An Integration of Modern Medicine and Ancient Vedic Perspectives on Overcoming Aging
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Physician, scientist, educator, and one of the world’s leading authorities on scientific, natural approaches for heart disease, high blood pressure, stress and other cardiovascular risk factors.
Hari Sharma

Hari Sharma, MD, DABIHM, FACN, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, USA
Ayurveda – How Purusha (Consciousness) and Prakriti (Nature) Manage Cellular Physiology
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Professor Emeritus, former Director Cancer Prevention and Natural Products Research, Ohio State University, published over 150 research papers, written five books, lectured worldwide at medical institutions and conferences, Smt. V. J. Thakar Gold Medal Award 2010, Gujarat Ayurved University.
Dr. Fred Travis

Frederick Travis, PhD, USA
Drivers of Development to Optimize Brain Maturation
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Professor of Maharishi Vedic Science, Chair of the Department of Maharishi Vedic Science, Dean of the Graduate School, and Director of the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition, Maharishi University of Management, USA.
Asmita Wele, MD

Dr. Asmita Wele, MD (Ayurveda pharmacology), India
Ayurveda Bio-inorganicals: Promising New Genre of Medicine
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Ayurveda Chair Debrecen, Hungary; Professor at Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University,
College of Ayurveda, Pune.
Ranjit Anand Puranik

Ranjit Anand Puranik, India
“Quality First Programme”: Implementing universally acceptable protocols in Quality Assurance.
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Executive Director and CEO of Shree Dhootapapeshwar Ltd., Mumbai; Advisor, Herbal and AYUSH Panel at PHARMEXCI.
Dr. med. Oliver Werner

Dr. med. Oliver Werner, Switzerland
Regulatory challenges facing Ayurvedic products in the European Union
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Director, Maharishi AyurVeda Products Europe BV, The Netherlands
Mark Rosenberg, Germany

Mark Rosenberg, Germany
The Future of Ayurveda Education in Europe
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Managing Director, European Academy for Ayurveda, Germany, Austria and Switzerland; Board of Directors, International Ayurveda Foundation; President VEAT, Int. Working Group “Ayurveda Education”, AYUSH.
Dr. med. Christian Kessler

Dr. med. Christian Kessler, MA, Germany
Comparative effectiveness of Ayurveda and conventional care in knee osteoarthritis – a randomized controlled trial
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Research Coordinator, Immanuel Hospital Berlin and Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
Anil Patil

Dr. Anil Patil, MBBS, MD (BOM), India
Efficacy of “Sanyukta Upachar Paddhati®” on tubal block
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Founder, Vedicure Wellness Pvt Ltd., wellness clinic aimed at treatment of individuals by adopting Sanyukta Upchar Paddhatir – Integrated Therapy.
Dr. Rohit Sane

Dr. Rohit Sane, India
Effect of heart failure reversal treatment as add-on therapy in patients with chronic heart failure
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Founder of Madhavbaug, multidisciplinary cardiac care centres and hospitals, researcher Heart Failure Reversal Therapy (Sampurna Hridaya Shuddhikaran).
Ashtavaidyan A N Narayanan Nambi

Ashtavaidyan A N Narayanan Nambi, MD (Ayu), India
Management of Hypothyroidism in Ayurveda
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Ayurvedic teacher, clinician, and researcher; Director Academic Division of SNA Oushadhasala Pvt. Ltd.; Faculty member of Ayurvedic Point, Italy; European Academy of Ayurveda, Germany.
Palitha Serasinghe

Palitha Serasinghe, D.A.M.S., PGCert HE, PhD – Medicine & Pharmacology, FAMA, MIBiol, MAPA, UK
Recent Advances of Research on Rasayana Herbs
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Former Senior Lecturer & Additional Director Institute Indigenous Medicine Colombo (SL); Visiting Academic Research Commonwealth Fellow, Kings College London; Principal Lecturer & Assistant Director, College of Ayurveda (UK).
Dr. Vijay Murthy

Dr. Vijay Murthy, PhD, UK
Healing Intentionality & Transferring Intentionality in consciousness based practice of Ayurveda in the management of Cancer
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B.Nat (NZ), M. Surgery (Ayu), B. Ayu Med & Surgery (IN), MPH (NZ); Ayurvedic physician; Director Ayuwave Ltd.
Renee Mann

Renee Mann, UK
State of Ayurvedic education in UK
President, Ayurveda Practitioners Association (APA), UK; Representative of European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association (EHTPA).
Dr. phil. Karin Pirc

Dr. phil. Karin Pirc, Germany
Treating Diabetes II with Maharishi Ayurveda
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Medical Director Maharishi AyurVeda Health Centre Bad Ems. She was honoured the “Global Hakim Ajmal Khan Award” as “Best Ayurvedic Physician 2006” and the “International Lifetime Achievement Award” in 2013 and is also the author of eight books on Ayurveda.
Dr. Indira Anand

Dr. Indira Anand, B.A. Hons Econ, B.T., M.A.Econ, PhD, B.A.Hons Ayurvedic Medicine, UK
Integrating Yoga and Ayurveda for Optimum Healthcare
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Chair: British Association of Accredited Ayurvedic Practitioners; Member NHS Register of Complementary Therapists; Chair: Sahara means Support (Reg Charity); Chair: SmS India Foundation.
Anand Shrivastava

Anand Shrivastava, India
Role of Maharishi AyurVeda in Health-Care and Longevity
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Chairman Maharishi Ayurveda Products; is engaged in Maharishi´s envisioned Mission of Re-enlivening Ayurveda by Synergizing with Modern Science, Quality Management Systems & Technologies.
Dr. med. Harsha Gramminger

Dr. med. Harsha Gramminger, Germany
Cost and Health Benefits from Integrating New Age Ayurveda into European Health Systems
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CEO and Clinic Director, Euroved GmbH, Germany & President of European Ayurveda Association.
Supaya Wenuganen

Supaya Wenuganen, PhD, Indonesia
Can Transcendental Meditation Increase Ojas and Reprogramme our Genome and Gene Expression for Longevity?
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Veda Vyasa award, outstanding research PhD graduate; former Vice Dean for the Faculty of Techno-biology, Atma Jaya University, Jakarta, Indonesia
Dr. med. Wolfgang Schachinger

Dr. med. Wolfgang Schachinger, Austria
Ama Pachana, research on heart rate variabilty
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President European Ayurveda Medical Association (EURAMA); Board German Ayurveda Association; Medical Director Maharishi AyurVeda Health Centre, Ried, Austria.
Dr. Gaurang Joshi

Dr. Gaurang Joshi, BAMS, India
Frontiers of Medicine in Ayurveda Dermatology (Psoriasis)
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Director Atharva Multispecialty Ayurveda Hospital, Rajkot; President International Psoriasis Foundation; Chairman Atharva Life Science Academic and Research Foundation.
Robert Verkerk

Robert Verkerk, BSc MSc DIC PhD FACN, UK
The future of Ayurvedic botanicals in the EU
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Founder, executive and scientific director, Alliance for Natural Health International and scientific director, Alliance for Natural Health USA.
Dr. Donn Brennan

Dr. Donn Brennan, MB BCh BAO, MRCGP, MScAyu, MSCI, Ireland
Can Ayurveda save the NHS?
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Founding President of the Ayurveda Practitioners Association in the UK. He is the Medical Director of the Maharishi Ayurveda Health Centre, Skelmersdale, UK.
Dr. phil. Malte Hozzel

Dr. phil. Malte Hozzel, Germany
Use of essential oils as anti-microbial allies
Founder of AYUS GmbH and Oshadhi GmbH, Germany, and Ayus Tunisia; Aromatherapy lecturer and founder of Orto de Prouvènço, Aromatherapy training Center in High Provence, France.
  • Abstract:

    Consciousness – The Foundation of Health, Happiness, and Long Life
    Tony Nader, MD, PhD, MARR

    Developing the full potential of every individual is the supreme goal of the health profession. Not only absence of disease and balance in mind and body ought to be aimed at but to guide every individual to fulfilment on every level personal, physical, mental and also vocational, social and cosmic. For this, we have to first define what the human potential is. According to all major traditions of knowledge and belief systems in the world, the individual is cosmic. Man was created in the image of God. The kingdom of heaven is within everyone. Veda declares a human being as Brahman, wholeness, and totality. Our research has shown that total knowledge available in Veda and the Vedic literature is embodied in the human physiology. Hundreds of scientific studies on Veda as available in Maharishi’s Vedic science and technology demonstrate that every individual can gain higher states of consciousness and rise to supreme balance, integration, fulfilment and enlightenment. Let us examine, and offer to the world from the platform of this great gathering of health scientists, the various procedures that not only can help to live a healthy, happy, and long life but also raise every individual and society to perfection creating enlightenment, peace and harmony for everyone and in the family of nations.

  • Abstract:

    A Disease-Free Society – Is It Possible?
    Dr.med. Rainer Picha, Austria

    Since Maharishi Mahesh Yogi’s goal was to create a disease-free society I will analyze whether it’s just an utopia or whether it may be doable.

    Ayurveda offers the complete knowledge of how to live a long life, but individual health is also influenced by outer factors such as social conflicts and stress, pollution of air, water, and food, indoor pollution, noise pollution, and various forms of radiation, just to name a few.

    In order to manage these innumerable factors that influence health from outside, a global transformation would be required that would include a respectful handling of mother earth, enlightened leadership, peace-promoting programmes, keeping the environment pure, and behaviour in tune with the laws of nature.

    Maharishi AyurVeda focuses on both individual and collective health, and handles them from their source – the field of consciousness – with Vedic technologies. I will give a short overview of some of these Vedic disciplines including approaches to collective health, applications of the discovery of Veda in the human physiology, light therapy with gems, Vedic architecture, and Vedic agriculture.

  • Abstract:

    Efforts of our Ayurveda Propagation Worldwide
    Prof. Dr. Subhash Ranade, India

    Since last 35 years we have propagated Ayurveda in 75 Countries in all 5 Continents of the World.

    In 1982 we started giving lectures at various Institutes in Germany. We worked with Seva Akademie and till this date we have trained over 600 Heilpraktikers.

    From 1983 we started working with various Institutes in Italy like IAAN. We also started our work in France from 1985.

    We established International Academy of Ayurveda in Pune, India for training foreigners in 1996. Till today we have given chance to our faculty members for 72 times to propagated Ayurveda Abroad.

    Conducted seminars in various Institutes in Swiss 2004, Hungary 2005, Portugal 2006.

    We started teaching Ayurveda in different Institutes in USA from 1986 and Canada 1993.

    Since 2003 we are working in Brazil on the invitation of Dr. Jose Rugue at his Shudha Dharma Mandal. Argentina 2006, Colombia 2009, Czechoslovakia 2009, Romania 2014, Serbia and Slovakia 2015.

    Also organized three International conferences in Dubai in 2011 and 2014 and in Malaysia in 2015.

    Opened IAA affiliated center –AIDA- in Japan in 1992.

    Signed MOU with centers in Poland, Greece and Spain and Austria, Israel, Russia, Brazil, Chile, Mauritius, Canada, USA, Australia, and Portugal.

    Our books have been translated in 13 languages and have given interview on Ayurveda in Countries like Germany, USA, Brazil, and Romania also.

  • Abstract:

    Ayurveda, a Foundation for Integrative Medicine
    Dr. med. Walter Mölk, Austria

    Integrative medicine is characterized by a holistic approach to the patient, including all aspects of lifestyle, and the use of different types of both conventional and alternative therapies. Maharishi Mahesh Yogi has pointed out that the successful integration of all these therapies can only be on the basis of the silent level of our own consciousness, Atma (the Self) or the Unified Field in the language of modern physics.

    In order to achieve effective prevention and healing without side-effects it is necessary to consider all influences that affect health. The three basic ayurvedic treatment types such as Daiva Vyaprashaya (spiritual therapy), Yukti Vyaprashaya (rational therapy) and Sattwavajaya (psychological therapy) can cover all these influences. The question is how they can be applied in a medical practice?

    This goal is achieved in Maharishi Ayurveda by a multimodality approach covering the whole range of Natural Law from the abstract, unmanifest field of creation to all the expressed levels of human life. The treatment modalities have an age-old tradition and many of them have been researched and the results published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. This approach also includes diagnostic methods and treatments of modern medicine, and systems of natural medicine with a long tradition and/or scientific studies proving their effectiveness.

    Maharishi Ayurveda is a prevention oriented system which also considers and integrates influences which are usually not taken into account by conventional medicine, including development of consciousness in the individual and in the society (level of coherence in collective consciousness), the near environment (architectural design and city planning) and the distant environment (cosmic influences from our solar system and the stars). The goal of all these approaches is, besides addressing specific health concerns, to enliven the inner intelligence of the body and create an ideal atmosphere for personal development and growth in a peaceful and affluent society.

    The patient is not so much interested in any particular system but wants to get cured without side-effects. Therefore it is not so important which system we use as a physician as long as we are able to achieve the above mentioned goals.

    The most fundamental level of Ayurvedic treatment is the state of Yoga or union, in which individual and cosmic intelligence are integrated. It is a dynamic state of perfect health where the person is established in himself, ‘Swa-sthya’, in the self-referral state of consciousness, ‘…Swarupe avasthanam’ (Yoga Sutra 1.3). Regular experience of this lively state of inner silence through the practice of Transcendental Meditation is the basis not only for individual health, but also for collective health, and therefore represents a good foundation for any kind of integrative medicine.

  • Abstract:

    Shifting Paradigms of Ayurvedic Education in Global Perspective
    Prof. Padma Shri Ram Harsh Singh, India

    The Background
    Ayurveda is the oldest system of life science and health care originating from India thousands of years ago continuing in an unbroken professional practice even today. Ayurveda seems to have been the world view of its time which shrank to Indian subcontinent due to the fast emergence of European medicine in colonial India. Now with the changing scenario of the health needs of the people world over and the unfolding inadequacies of main stream conventional medicine in coping with the challenges of the newer health hazards such as stress, population aging and life-style related non-communicable diseases, Ayurveda has started re-globalizing. In this context Ayurvedic education and research are of prime significance.
        In India, Shri Lanka and Nepal Ayurveda is a fully official system of medicine and these countries have evolved a suitable regulation and infrastructure for Ayurvedic education and practice. Except Five countries in Europe and few states in US in other countries Ayurveda is not yet officially recognized nor there is scope of respectable employment in this sector. Hence at this stage the Indian model of five and half years full time UG course and further three years full time specialized PG course in Ayurveda may not be feasible in western countries. US and EU Ayurveda enthusiasts should develop their own model, of course Indian experts may help in developing the model according to the need and demand of the course seekers. Later when the number of seekers grows and legal situations change one can think of uniform global model of Ayurvedic education as was done in case of modern medicine and more recently Traditional Chinese medicine which has now become the licensed system of medicine in US. The principle of globalization with local perspective is the right policy.
        Government of India has already started taking initiatives by creating Professorial Ayurveda Chairs in different countries on its own cost besides considering to establish a Council for International Cooperation in India with subunits in different member countries. This Council besides Advisory role may also accredit the quality of courses, programs and institutions involved in Ayurveda related activities outside India.

    The Indian Perspective
    Currently there are over 265 Undergraduate and 65 Postgraduate Ayurvedic colleges producing over 12000 UG and 2000 PG new Ayurveda doctors every year with about 450000 registered Ayurveda practitioners in the field, besides many centers of postgraduate education and a huge research organization controlled by fully legalized regulatory bodies like CCIM and CCRAS respectively. However, the entire organization still needs lot of improvement in terms of policies, programs and the infrastructure besides enhanced public fund support.
        In case of Ayurveda education in India the long drawn issues are 1. Basic school qualification for admission to UG courses, 2. Distribution of different subjects in 3 or 4 professional segments of the course, 3. The issue of strengthening the knowledge of Sanskrit language, 4. To determine the quantum of complementary knowledge of modern medicine needed for Ayurvedic graduates, 5. To induce scientific temper and work culture among the students, 6. To promote the professional competence among the graduates so that they practice Ayurveda without undue dependence on conventional medicine, 7. Strategies of bilateral integration including the issue of adding essentials of Ayurveda in MBBS course using the experiences of the success story of TCM in China, 8. Promotion and regulation of Ayurved education, research and practice out-side India, 9. Examination reform and student-centered teaching with ability to fruitfully interface the Shastra with science and the clinic. 10. Strategies to strengthen the infrastructure particularly the quality of teachers and hospital facilities in Ayurvedic colleges.

    The Global Perspective
    As mentioned at the outset considering the ongoing globalization of Ayurveda today there is a need to develop interim courses and curricula to suit the course seekers today in the west where Ayurveda is not yet fully recognized, besides defining the kind of Ayurvedic practice which can be legally pursued globally. Ayurveda is dominantly a health oriented system and has real strength in promotive and preventive health care. Ayurvedic doctors may flourish more as a health practitioner than as a medical practitioner. Hence the Ayurvedic education outside India needs to be suitably tailored. As stated earlier the Ayurveda enthusiasts in US and EU should develop their own model of Ayurvedic education and Indian experts may help. The initiatives taken by NAMA in US to develop part time Diploma, Certificate, Bachelors and Masters courses in Ayurveda as are in operation at certain Ayurveda colleges in US and Ayurveda programs designed for qualified Registered doctors and therapists in Germany and similar other courses in different countries are good attempts but need improvement and streamlining and better operation.
        Government of India has already started taking initiatives in terms of creating Ayurveda Chairs in different countries and is considering launching a Council for International Cooperation to promote the ongoing program. The Indian research organizations are also playing activism to conduct scientific research in the science of Ayurveda and the therapeutics of Ayurveda to transform Ayurveda as a evidence based system of medicine which is the prime public demand in India and world over. It is hoped these researches will help sustain the globalization movement of Ayurveda.

  • Abstract:

    Structure and logic underlying the Ayurvedic knowledge system
    Padma Shri Prof. Anant Darshan Shankar, India

    The sophistication of the Ayurveda lies in the fact that it possesses the four key features of a mature system of knowledge viz., observations of the range of changes that occur in biological processes, rule based categorization of the changes at multiple levels, linking the changes to causality (not mere correlations) and restoration of homeostasis. The presence of these four features suggest its maturity. Modern knowledge systems have not yet evolved to achieve these features of maturity. The knowledge has a 3 tiered structure, existential principles (Tatwas), Science that governs the analysis of changes (Shastra) and rules of application specific to time and space (Vyavhar). A unique property of knowledge in Ayurveda is that it is not a function of time but of states of mind. It is this property that explains how knowledge of health generated in 1500 BC guides solution to problems in the 21st century.

  • Abstract:

    Integrative Approaches For The Future: Ayurveda, Genomics and Epigenetics
    Prof. Bhushan Patwardhan, PhD, FAMS, India

    In the Vedic knowledge systems, the syllable Om symbolized a primordial sound what stands unchanged behind the changes we see. In the modern science genome symbolizes an immortal unbroken chain of life. Omics involve study of not only genome but also other consequential molecules like proteins and metabolites. Today modern science is moving in the direction of systems biology, artificial intelligence and complexity theories, where importance of holistic approaches is recognized. Advances in molecular biology and omics technologies are shaping current understanding of biomedicine, yet the promise of personalized medicine has not materialized. With emerging science of epigenetics, scientists are now realizing avenues beyond genetics. Need for systems approach and nonlinear complexity sciences is intensely felt than ever before. In such a situation, basic principles like loka, purusha, mahabhuta, dosha, rasa, guna, agni and prakriti have become more relevant. Ayurveda has person-centered approach where each individual requires personalized diet, lifestyle, and therapeutics. An emerging field of research field known as Ayugenomics is now showing new ways to expedite the progress of personalized health and integrative medicine of the future.

  • Abstract:

    Maharishi Vedic Medicine is Ultra-Modern, Cutting-Edge Medicine — Unified Field Based Medicine
    John Hagelin (PhD Harvard), USA

    Recent breakthroughs in our scientific understanding of the Universe from string theory and M-theory present Ayurvedic medicine in a completely new light. They reveal that Ayurvedic medicine is unified field based medicine—i.e., the direct application to human health of the deepest principles of nature’s functioning—i.e., the deepest laws of nature governing subatomic scales. Specifically, the three doshas directly correlate, in modern scientific terms, to the three superfields of supersymmetric quantum field theory; the pancha mahabhutas to the five quantum-mechanical spin-types; and the Atma (Self), which is fundamental to Ayurveda, correlates to the “unified field” or superstring field. This new understanding from modern physics reveals that Ayurvedic medicine is more fundamental—and thus potentially more powerful—than contemporary pharmacological medicine. It also explains why Ayurveda, being unified field based medicine, is truly holistic—and hence naturally free of adverse side effects, in comparison to more superficial and fragmented allopathic approaches.

  • Abstract:

    Ayurveda for cognitive and behavioral disorders
    Prof. Gunvant Yeola, MD, India

    Psychological diseases are characterized by memory loss, unusual behavior, personality changes, and a decline in cognitive function. Indeed, several scientific studies have described the use of various Ayurvedic medicinal plants viz. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), Turmeric (Curcuma longa), Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri), Shankhpushpi (Convolvulus pluricaulis), Jyotishmati (Celastrus paniculatus), Jatamansi (Nardostachys jatamansi) and their constituents for treatment of Psychological diseases.
    One novel method of Nasya, is a practical, non-invasive, rapid, and simple method of drug delivery. A second, simple method of administration involves application of the medicated oil on the body and massaging the areas with gentle or deep hand strokes. Ayurveda also relies on several trans-cranial oleation (Shirabhyanga) therapies for nervous system disorders that are non-systemic and non-invasive. Recent work again points to the possibility that the endothelial cells facilitate the entry of the solutes through the frontal lobe and prefrontal cortex.

    Comparative study to evaluate the efficacy of topical oil application on scalp for memory enhancement
    Purpose of study – This study was based on clinical experiences of topical oil application popularly known as Shiropichu and Shiroabhyanga. This pilot comparative open label clinical study was planned to evaluate effectiveness of topical oil application on scalp by considering its usefulness for enhancement of memory. Hence, this study was planned for school going children who are normal yet hyperactive, and comparison will be made with normal child with normal activity. Material and Methodology – Group A, N = 15 Participants received topical application of coconut oil. Group B, N = 15 Participants received topical application of medicated coconut oil. Each group was advised to do Shiroabhyanga and Shiropichu alternate days. Memory assessment was done by using Wechsler memory scale at baseline and every thirty days for three months. Conclusion – In conclusion it appears that topical oil application modifies both memory/concentration as well as intellectual functions.

  • Abstract:

    Concept of Immunisation in Ayurveda
    Dr. Sunanda Ranade, India

    Immunization is the process whereby a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically by the administration of a vaccine. As the modern medical researches get advanced the vaccines were introduced.

    Ayurveda old science of life has different view regarding immunization. It has given emphasis on keeping the balance between nature and human being. This science believes that Man is the miniature of the Nature. Boosting the immune system naturally is the principle of Ayurveda.

    When the Vaccine were not invented medicines like Suvanaprash were working and still are working wonderfully to give support to protect the child from infectious diseases.

    Now a days everything is polluted including Air, Water, Food. It is very difficult to protect child and bring him up naturally. But still very few families trying for that.

    Side effects of the vaccines is the subject of the research. But the concept of the Ayurvedic immunization is a hope of ray for good healthy generation.

  • Abstract:

    Ayurvedic dietary approaches in combatting NCD’s
    Professor Gerard Bodeker, UK

    Chair, Global Initiative For Traditional Systems (GIFTS) of Health, Oxford, UK;
    & Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, UK;
    & Dept. of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, USA

    WHO (2016) has identified Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) as the leading cause of death worldwide, with almost three quarters of all NCD deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

    The Global Burden of Disease Study (2013) has found diet to be more associated with disease burden than physical inactivity or high body mass index.

    Increasingly, the Mediterranean Diet is touted as the dietary pattern to counter NCDs. The Mediterranean Diet, a Western diet, studied by Westerners on Westerners, is now being recommended for the world, 75% of which is non-Western. This approach does not take into account cultural traditions of nutrition (and hence compliance), local food crops, or perspectives from epigenetics, metabolomics or nutrigenomics.

    Ayurvedic diets are rich in pharmacologically active compounds with anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anticancer and cardioprotective properties – hence in combatting NCDs.

    Ayurveda’s personalized approach to nutrition is premised on different foods being suited to different metabolic types, different seasons, and different times of day. Here, metabolomics, nutrigenomics, epigenetics and chronobiology converge.

    Congruent with the trend towards personalized medicine, research now offers genomic evidence for the construct validity of Ayurvedic body types. Ayurveda’s personalized nutritional framework and six-taste system for classifying foods merits evaluation as a culture-free nutritional strategy, applicable across dietary traditions and food types in preventing and managing NCDs.

  • Abstract:

    Ideal Panchakarma Center, Charaka’s view
    Vaidyaraj Sunil B. Patil, India

    Ayurveda is becoming more and more popular in last few decades. All approach of Ayurveda especially the Panchakarma Therapy is widely accepted as preventive and therapeutic major.

    Panchakarma is an integral part of Ayurveda and it is in practice from ancient days. Panchakarma is the only Therapy available to element impurities and cleansing of your body, this therapy detoxification your body, recharge your mind and rejuvenates you.

    The number of Panchakarma practitioners and experts is increasing now a days. They are certainly needed proper Guidance about how to start the Panchakarma Hospitals. Acharya Charaka has been well explained about ideal Panchakarma centre.

    The Vastu, the main Building and various Departments, different staff, Dietary regime, surroundings, Different sections of Panchakarma treatments with the proper guidance from Charak Samhita – Sutrasthana Chapter 15, one can easily learn how to raise and maintained an ideal Panchakarma Centre and give maximum benefits to their patients.

  • Abstract:

    Microbiom and Ayurveda
    Dr. Keith Wallace, USA

    In Ayurveda, food is regarded as medicine. Modern research on the human microbiome is helping to give a more comprehensive scientific understanding of this concept. The term microbiome describes the microorganisms that reside within us, as well as the collective genes they contain. The greatest quantity of these microorganisms is located in the gut. Recent research has revealed that large of diseases are affected by the state of our gut bacteria through the gutbrain axis. Diet is one of main factors that can disrupt the gut bacteria and cause a toxic inflammatory state that leads to disease. What is remarkable is that as a result of the research on the microbiome many other important concepts in Ayurveda, such as ama and agni, can now be scientifically understood. This will inevitably lead to a greater acceptance of Ayurveda’s profound programs for improving the health of our mind and body.

  • Abstract:

    Consciousness Based Health Care: modulating gene expression to achieve system-wide balance and integration through the Ayurvedic modality, Transcendental Meditation
    John Fagan, PhD Cornell Univ., USA, Wenuganen Supaya, Ken Walton, R. Keith Wallace, Fred Travis, and Meera Srivastava

    The core modality of consciousness based medicine, Transcendental Meditation (TM), triggers changes in the expression of specific genes that are likely to be involved in bringing about and maintaining a state of balance and integration in the physiology. Extensive research over a period of more than 45 years has demonstrated a wide range of beneficial effects of TM on physical, mental and emotional health and well-being. Consistent with these studies, research has also demonstrated that TM is a useful therapeutic intervention in acute PTSD, depression, and cardiovascular disease, and that health care utilization is reduced in populations that practice TM regularly. The physiological and neurophysiological processes by which TM exerts these effects have also been studied, showing that TM has profound effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and on other regulatory networks involved in responses to stress. Powerful methods have recently become available that make it possible to simultaneously measure changes in expression of all of the genes in the human genome. These methods have opened up a wide new frontier for research in consciousness, making it possible to explore in full detail the molecular correlates of meditation and of higher states of consciousness. This paper will present the first work completed to date measuring genome-wide gene expression in lymphocytes from experienced practitioners of the TM technique compared to healthy controls matched by age, sex, diet, and tobacco and alcohol use. Microarray analysis identified 74 genes that were differentially expressed in long-term meditators, 18 of which were up-regulated and 56 down-regulated. Micro-array results for selected genes were also confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR. Most of the 74 genes segregate into three regulatory networks having to do with immune function, stress responses, inflammation, tumor suppression, and cell motility, growth, adhesion and differentiation. Genes involved in the stress response, inflammation and cardiovascular disease were generally found to be reduced in expression in subjects who practice TM. In contrast, the levels of expression of two tumor suppressor genes were found to be increased. The observed molecular changes are consistent with the previously reported physiological benefits of regular practice of the TM technique—reduced stress and inflammation, and reduced cardiovascular risk.

  • Abstract:

    Mind over Aging: An Integration of Modern Medicine and Ancient Vedic Perspectives on Overcoming Aging
    Robert H. Schneider, MD, FACC, USA

    Everyone ages – in every country, culture and time epoch. Usually beyond 40, aging is associated with a decline in mental and physical abilities. To live longer, healthier and happier lives, people often turn to a plethora of products that promise to slow the biological clock only to find that none of these widely marketed approaches brings complete or long-lasting fulfillment.

    Fortunately, modern medical science has discovered the secrets of an ancient system of natural medicine that has been shown to prevent and slow the aging process. This holistic approach to aging enhances the mind and body from deep within, using the wisdom of the body’s inner intelligence. It’s the world’s most ancient, complete and sophisticated system of natural medicine revised in a modern scientific context with the development of consciousness at its foundation. This is Maharishi AyurVeda, including the Transcendental Meditation technique.

    In this presentation, we review the ancient Ayurvedic understanding of the aging process and prescriptions for Rasayana therapy, including behavioral Rasayanas may be understood and validated with modern scientific insights and experiments. These modern concepts encompass epigenetics, the microbiome, mind-body medicine and successful aging. This combination of modern and ancient Vedic views leads to an integrated vision of possibilities for enhancing the aging process in contemporary society.

  • Abstract:

    Ayurveda – How Purusha (Consciousness) and Prakriti (Nature) Manage Cellular Physiology
    Hari Sharma, MD, DABIHM, FACN, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, USA

    This presentation will cover the role of Purusha (Consciousness) and Prakriti (Nature) in managing cellular physiology. It will cover how the activities of the human constitution affect cellular function – as you sow, so shall you reap – this is the theory of karma in action in cellular activities. It will also cover what is kundalini (individualized life force) in cells and what the activation of kundalini means on cellular level affecting health. The presentation will also include how Ayurveda covers and manages both the genetic code and phenotype in maintaining optimal health.

  • Abstract:

    Drivers of Development to Optimize Brain Maturation
    Frederick Travis, PhD, USA

    This talk will explore how age-appropriate experiences enhance brain and cognitive development throughout the lifespan. These age-appropriate experiences would be the drivers at each age. We explore how a nurturing caregiver is the driver in the first years of life, how language learning is the driver from three to ten years, and how problem solving is the driver in the teenage years. To continue development in adult years, it is necessary to transcend thought. Thus, Transcendental Meditation, which is a meditation technique designed for transcending, is a requirement to optimize human development.

  • Abstract:

    Ayurveda Bio-inorganicals – Promising New Genre of Medicine
    Asmita Wele, MD (Ayurveda pharmacology), India

    Importance of metals and minerals in human physiology and therefore in bio-medicine is well accepted. Metaloproteins and metaloenzymes that actively participate in biological functions are so named because they bear one or more metal ion cofactor. Diseases which are linked to deficiency of metals like Calcium, Iron, Selenium etc. are treated by supplementation. The concept of bio-inorganicals is not new to Ayurveda. Rasashastra the branch of metal-mineral medicine gives detail monographs of 80 inorganic elements which are treated with organic substances to convert them into potent medicines. Unlike modern metal-ions these bio-inorganicals are not in ionic form. Most widely known category of bio-inorganics in Ayurveda is bhasma. Excluding the so called heavy metal bhasmas Rasashastra gives an account of about 30-35 bhasmas having varied therapeutic actions. Bhasmas prepared from sea shells are not used as calcium supplements but each of the shells is indicated for a different disease. Conch shell bhasma is administered in ophthalmic conditions whereas Cowrie bhasma is used in ulcerative colitis. Ayurvedic bio-inorganicals with indications different than merely nutritional supplement can give impetus to new leads.

  • Abstract:

    “Quality First Programme”: Implementing universally acceptable protocols in Quality Assurance.
    Ranjit Anand Puranik, India

    ‘Quality’ is an everchanging definition always reflecting excellence in whichever industry or service it is applied to. ‘Quality’ and consistent performance can be sustained by industry only and only, when the fundamental architecture is
    synchornised to deliver the warranted result. Such quality first ethos is hard to find and in industry its very easy to fall prey to ‘protests’ that shun change and clamour static mode in a dynamic market place. Most of the issues start when
    one is reactionary to seemingly ever changing regulatory demands, proactive somehow is not a mindset identified with compliance. There are no real reasons for this global negative churn but is universally observed in industry approaches. It is always better to align with a medium term thought in readying enterprise to meet the challenges of a dynamic regulation. Having ones own Quality First Programme, defined in-house Quality standards that ramp up the organisation in preparedness to the immediate coming 5 years is a basic tenet to be ahead of the wave.

    The statement of readying a ‘Quality First Programme’ is displayed above and reflects the mind set currently applicable to challenges facing the Ayurved industry. Some of the ideals are universal truths extending themselves to dietary supplements, functional foods and such like allied markets. Fair Trade, Organic sourcing of raw materials, rolling out traceability programme, keeping up with GMP’s, understanding pharmacopoeia and its relevance to Ayurved manufacturing and a current product monograph – are some of the highlights the presentation would cover. In Ayurved where basic fundamental research may not offer much viable programmes the creative genius in every enterprise must be honed to development of a set of standards that meet every global regulatory wish. ‘Times are changing …’, maybe a realisation but thankfully this change as is seen over the past 3 decades is in slow motion, perfectly viable to keep up and only limited by ones own subscription to Quality First.

    The talk would concentrate on giving depth to a Quality First Programme in the hope that it impacts a more accepting mindset towards excellence in Ayurved industry.

  • Abstract:

    Regulatory challenges facing Ayurvedic products in the European Union
    Dr. med. Oliver Werner, Switzerland

    According to the regulations of the EU, any product designed to be taken in by humans can be either a food or a medicine. Medicines need to be registered with the authorities. For this, documentations showing the effectiveness, safety and pharmaceutical quality of the products need to be presented. Preparation of these is very costly (minimum several 100 000 Euro, but often millions). Therefore, Ayurvedic products until now are generally marketed as food supplements. Unfortunately, here it is not possible to make any claims about effects against diseases.

    A troublesome issue is the Novel Food regulation, which stipulates that products introduced after May 1997 are “Novel Food” and need to go through a tedious registration process. Fortunately, most Ayurvedic plants have been available in the EU since before this date.

    All products must be tested for purity. Levels of heavy metals, pesticide residues, bacteriology and fungal toxins need to be within with EU limits. Complying with this regulation is important, as there has been negative publicity about poor-quality products with high levels of such impurities, which creates a very bad image of our science.

  • Abstract:

    The Future of Ayurveda Education in Europe
    Mark Rosenberg, Germany

    During the last 20 years, a variety of Ayurveda education schemes have been successfully established in Europe. The European Academy of Ayurveda alone has trained more than 20,000 students in Ayurveda medicine and therapy, among them 500 doctors and medical professionals participating in its university program “Master of Science in Ayurvedic Medicine”.

    Presently, we have to face the challenge of further professionalizing these study courses in order to integrate Ayurveda into modern education for medical experts. First of all, it will be necessary to adapt the curricula to the requirements of both educational and healthcare systems, which are currently in place in western countries. These measures include the definition of learning outcomes and an appropriate form to assess the students’ competences, as it is common in the framework of higher education. Moreover, modern technologies will have to be integrated into traditional teaching methods. Whereas an experienced teacher will remain indispensable to bring Ayurvedic knowledge to life and transfer it by a holistic approach, didactics may well include e-learning elements.

    But it will not be enough to focus entirely on theoretical knowledge. Sound Ayurveda education rather requires a dense network of clinics, medical practices and institutions where students are able to complete their knowledge by practical skills. In this context, it is also recommendable to promote the exchange of students and faculty members within the framework of international cooperation programs.

    In the end, on aspect must not be forgotten: In Ayurveda education, we are always confronted with the challenge to reconcile the call for evidence-based science and the holistic as well as spiritual dimension of Ayurveda. In his lecture, Mark Rosenberg will describe his experiences in establishing state-approved education programs for Ayurveda medicine and complementary therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

  • Abstract:

    Comparative effectiveness of Ayurveda and conventional care in knee osteoarthritis – a randomized controlled trial
    Dr. med. Christian Kessler, MA, Germany

    Background: Ayurveda is used to treat knee osteoarthritis (OA) despite limited evidence in international medical databases. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of complex multimodality Ayurvedic treatment in comparison to conventional care in OA knee patients.

    Methods: 151 patients (mean age 61.2 years; 116 females, 35 males) with OA of the knee according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria were included in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial and treated in 2 hospital outpatient clinics and 2 private outpatient clinics with a total of 5 physicians and 20 therapists participating. Patients received either Ayurvedic treatment (n=77) or conventional care (n=74) with 15 treatments over 12 weeks. Customized Ayurvedic treatment included specific manual treatments and massages, diet counseling including specific consideration of selected food items, the nutritional Ayurvedic supplements Ashvagandha and Yogaraja Guggulu, general and specific lifestyle advice, knee specific yoga posture advice and introduction to daily self-applied knee massage. Primary outcome was the change on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index after 12 weeks (validated German version). Secondary outcomes included the WOMAC subscales (pain: range 0-50; stiffness: range 0-20; and function: range 0-170); a pain disability index, numeric rating scales for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood index, rescue medication use, and safety issues.

    Results: Changes of the WOMAC Index from baseline to 12 weeks were more pronounced in the Ayurveda group [mean difference 61.0 (95% CI 52.4; 69.6)] than in the conventional group [32.0 (95% CI 21.4;42.6)] resulting in a significant difference between groups (p<0.001) and a clinically relevant effect size [Cohen’s d 0.68 (95% CI 0.35;1.01)]. Similar tendencies were observed for all secondary outcomes at week 12. Effects were sustainable at follow-ups after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions: The results suggest that a complex Ayurvedic treatment might be clinically superior to complex conventional care in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Registration: The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov under NCT01225133.
    Funding Source: Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India.

  • Abstract:

    Efficacy of “Sanyukta Upachar Paddhati®” on tubal block
    Anil Patil, MBBS, MD (BOM), India

    Fallopian tube obstruction is a major cause of female infertility. Blocked Fallopian tubes are unable to let the ovum and the sperm converge, thus making fertilization impossible.

    Approximately 20% of female infertility can be attributed to tubal causes.[1] In advanced modern sciences, the options to rectify the condition are either surgical or In-vitro fertilization.

    This paper is based on clinical success stories in very interesting and encouraging tubal block cases. Success was achieved with a specially developed integrated therapy of treatment i.e. “SANYUKTA UPACHAR PADDHATI®”. This direction will surely help to all, as a new perspective towards the obstruction of Fallopian tubes.

    References
    1.Yen SSC, Jaffe RB, Barbieri RL (1999).Reproductive Endocrinology (4th ed.). W. B. Saunders.

  • Abstract:

    Effect of heart failure reversal treatment as add-on therapy in patients with chronic heart failure: A randomized, open-label study
    Dr. Rohit Sane, India

    Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate effect of heart failure reversal therapy (HFRT) using herbal procedure (panchakarma) and allied therapies, as add-on to standard CHF treatment (SCT) in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients.

    Methods: This open-label, randomized study conducted in CHF patients (aged: 25–65 years, ejection fraction: 30–65%), had 3-phases: 1-week screening, 6-week treatment (randomized [1:1] to HFRT + SCT or SCT-alone) and follow-up (12-week). Twice weekly HFRT (60–75 min) consisting of snehana (external oleation), swedana (passive heat therapy), hrudaydhara (concoction dripping treatment) and basti (enema) was administered. Primary endpoints included evaluation of change in metabolic equivalents of task (MET) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) from baseline, at end of 6-week treatment and follow-up at week-18 (non-parametric rank ANCOVA analysis). Safety and quality of life (QoL) was assessed. Results: Seventy CHF patients (n = 35, each treatment-arm; mean [SD] age: 53.0 [8.6], 80% men) were enrolled in the study. All patients completed treatment phase…

  • Abstract:

    Management of Hypothyroidism in Ayurveda
    Ashtavaidyan A N Narayanan Nambi, MD (Ayu), India

    Thyroid disorders are the most common disorders of the endocrine glands. It is estimated that about 42 million people suffer from thyroid disorders in India. Women are 6 times more prone than men. In general; disorders of thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, goitre and iodine deficiency disorders, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, thyroid cancer. Hypothyroidism is one of the most common functional disorders of thyroid gland.

    The Thyroid gland produces two related hormones Thyroxin [T4] and Triiodothyronine [T3]. These hormones play a critical role in cell differentiation during development and
    help maintain thermogenic and metabolic homeostasis in the body. Deficiency of these hormones is known as Hypothyroidism. It occurs due to the hypo functioning of Thyroid gland
    which results in decrease in body’s basal metabolic rate [BMR].

    Hypothyroidism is a common condition with various causes like Autoimmune, Iatrogenic, Transient Thyroiditis, Iodine Deficiency, Stressful life style, Congenital, Infiltrative, Secondary Hypothyroidism. The clinical presentation depends on the duration and severity of the Hypothyroidism. A state of Hypothyroidism may be due to primary disease of the Thyroid gland itself or lack of Pituitary TSH [Thyroid Stimulating Hormone] or Hypothalamic TRH [Thyrotropine Releasing Hormone].

    The signs and symptoms of Hypothyroidism at the initial stage are vague and ambiguous which is often missed in its early stages and instead treated for infertility, hyperlipidaemia, depression etc. In primary stage the signs and symptoms are in general but later on affect the different systems of the body and worsen the condition of patient. Hence, Hypothyroidism is an important public health issue.

    Management of Hypothyroidism with the modern drugs may bring the value of TSH and T4 to normal range but the increased dosage and continuous medication are cost expensive and make the patient into drug dependent till the end of mortal life. So, a better, safer and long lasting therapy is needed for the present society and now it is a demand of time to
    search the management for this type of ailment through the heritage of Ayurveda.

    As in our Ayurveda texts mentioned, it is not possible to name all the manifesting diseases, as the Doshas based upon the Samuttana vishesha and Sthanantara gati leads to a wide array of diseases. In such a situation where the disease can’t be named, the treatment must be done by understanding the Vikara prakriti, Adhishtana and Samuttana Vishesha. The presenting complaints of Hypothyroidism can be understood and assessed based on the involved Agni, Dosha, Dushya, Sthana and Srotus.

  • Abstract:

    Recent Advances of Research on Rasayana Herbs
    Palitha Serasinghe, D.A.M.S., PGCert HE, PhD – Medicine & Pharmacology, FAMA, MIBiol, MAPA, UK

    Amalaki and Guduci are two major herbs used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine and are well known as ‘rasayana’ drugs. These drugs mainly deal with the preservation and promotion of health by strengthening the body against ageing and disease. Rasanaya drugs act by modulating the neuro-endocrine-immune systems and they have been identified as rich source of antioxidants. Antioxidants can prevent or correct oxidative damage by free radicals produced in the living cells causing damage to DNA and other biological molecules producing conditions such as cancer. This study evaluated the antioxidant activity of the two herbs and the potential contribution in complementing the cancer chemotherapy. This paper will review recent advances on research on Rasayana herbs and present our own research on Amalaki and Guduci.

    The water and 50% water and ethanol extracts were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured using DPPH scavenging assay. The herbal extracts as well as FDU (an established chemotherapy drug) were evaluated on their effect on the proliferation rate of acute leukaemia cell lines (MOLM 13). Untreated cells were used as negative control. The results of this study confirm the antioxidant activity of the herbs and in concomitant use and clearly indicate the anti-proliferative effect of the extracts, Amalaki alone possessing more inhibitory effect on MOLM 13 cell lines.

  • Abstract:

    Healing Intentionality & Transferring Intentionality in consciousness based practice of Ayurveda in the management of Cancer
    Dr. Vijay Murthy, PhD, UK

    Our very nature is intentional and the most basic intentionality in nature is to be whole. DNA programming, reproduction of cells, tissue repair, wound healing and the entire process of life are examples of nature’s intentionality in operation. This concept of nature’s intentionality is embedded in the Vedic mind-set that is the hallmark of Ayurvedic practice. Prior to the influence of western thought and colonial medicine in India the practice of Ayurveda did not digress from the application of the consciousness model for healing.

    Unlike the modern western approach to cancer, Ayurvedic practices do not make watertight components of the tumour, the person and psycho-emotional consequences of the condition on the person in the management of cancer. While the body’s ability to heal could be considered generic intentionality, which is the basic level of intentionality, upon which the body functions in states of health and ill-health, becoming conscious of the body’s intentionality and directing intentionality to heal oneself can be termed healing intentionality.

    Ayurvedic healing in cancer and any other conditions is always a collaboration between the person and the practitioner. In modern day Ayurvedic practice, in the context of cancer management, an ayurvedic practitioner would therefore advise, train and guide the person with cancer on various self-care practices such as Dinacharya, Pranayama, Dhyana and meditation to invoke ‘healing intentionality’ within the person. Healing intentionality also evolves with one’s experiences in life. Healing intentionality is both the capacity for and the development of specific intent for healing. Researchers demonstrate that persons mindful of this healing potential experience it in their thoughts, sensations, behaviour and actions.

    When the practitioner is engaged in honing the art of healing intentionality, then he/she becomes capable of transferring intentionality. For some practitioners transferring intentionality can be an innate gift. Ayurveda recognises the outcome of any effort to heal as a result of the level of engagement in consciousness on part of the practitioner as well as the patient. This presentation provides a framework for practitioners to apply the consciousness model of Ayurveda in the management of cancer by suggesting principles and methods of developing healing intentionality and transferring intentionality.

  • Abstract:

    Treating Diabetes II with Maharishi Ayurveda
    Dr. phil. Karin Pirc, Germany

    Since Diabetes – if untreated – goes along with dysuria, it is dealt in the classical ayurvedic texts as prameha, a variety of diseases which are connected to the disturbed urine production.

    Diabetes II in Ayurveda is considered as life style disease – in terms of modern medicine it is caused by insuline resistance of body cells and malfunction of the insuline producing cells of the pancreas. Both causes are successfully dealt with in Ayurveda. Insuline restistance in ayurvedic terms is the blockage of the srotas due to unhealthy eating habits and behaviour, whereas the pancreatic cells are underfunctioning.

    Therefore treating diabetes is an ayurvedic multimodality concept which includes purification methods like panchakarma, ama reduction with food regimen and lifestyle as well as herbal compounds for purification and stimulation of pancreatic cells. With this combination of therapies all cases of Diabetes II can be reversed, most often completely cured while the late complications can be prevented and many of them reversed also.

  • Abstract:

    Integrating Yoga and Ayurveda for Optimum Healthcare
    Dr. Indira Anand, B.A. Hons Econ, B.T., M.A.Econ, PhD, B.A.Hons Ayurvedic Medicine, UK

    Yoga should be treated as a therapeutic tool of Ayurveda for both disease treatment and for lifestyle management. Yoga postures and pranayama treat a variety of ailments, particularly structural problems or low energy conditions and are among the best tools for keeping our doshas in balance. Pranayama is most effective in treating diseases of the respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems, whose function depend upon the right flow of prana. It is excellent for all conditions of debility, low energy, chronic fatigue, weak immunity and convalescence. Yoga is also excellent for psychological and mental disorders because of its specific action on the mind through deep relaxation and meditation. Yoga methods cover the entire field of our existence – from the physical, sensory, emotional, mental and spiritual. Patient care could be optimised by combining the two therapeutic regimes, with no additional expense and less reliance on medicines. It is particularly relevant for overseas Ayurvedic practitioners. Yoga as a therapy was traditionally prescribed in an ayurvedic context. It is a great pity that very few present day Ayurvedic practitioners prescribe Yogic practices.

  • Abstract:

    Role of Maharishi AyurVeda in Health-Care and Longevity
    Anand Shrivastava, India

    Maharishi Mahesh Yogi has given us a very deep insight into the vast field of Ayurveda. Upon seeing it thoroughly we can say that it is nothing but a reminder of the original knowledge of Ayurveda in it’s holistic form, which was given to us by Rishis and Maharishis since time immemorial. This full glory of Ayurveda is now known as “Maharishi AyurVeda”.

    The whole premise of Maharishi Ayurveda lies in living a disease and suffering free life leading to enlightenment. Maharishi Ayurveda considers that Ayurvedic wisdom is for re-enlivening the memory of body functions and re-establishing balance in the whole physiology, using synergy of herbs and various therapies including detoxification, cleansing, Asanas, Pranayama, TM, etc.

    Once the balance in physiology is restored, the perfect health as defined by Ayurveda is attained and maintaining that is real Health Care Maharishi AyurVeda is aiming for. This will ensure peak performance of the whole system as per desire and one can enjoy longevity not by just adding years to life but life to years.

  • Abstract:

    Cost and Health Benefits from Integrating New Age Ayurveda into European Health Systems
    Dr. med. Harsha Gramminger, Germany

    General Health Costs are spiraling in all developed and developing nations of the world. In 2013, Germany spent almost €315 billion on health. This was an increase of about €12.1 billion compared to 2012: €3,910 in 2013 vs. €3,770 in 2012 per inhabitant. Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity, Hyperlipidemia, Hypertension & other “civilization” diseases are the main factors for these costs.

    With over 8 million sufferers (in 2009 and growing), Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most widespread diseases in Germany. Serious “secondary complications” and “associated diseases” / co-morbidities include heart attack, stroke, athlete’s foot etc.

    Total costs €3,817 includes three components: direct – disease, indirect, and associated complication.

    Obesity is another new global epidemic and set to become the number one health problem globally by the year 2025. In 2013, 52% of all Germans were overweight, which is about 42.02 Million people! The associated conditions include: Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, Vascular diseases, Stroke, Coronary heart disease, Gall stones, Cancer, Sleep Apnea Syndrome, Diseases of the joints and of the skin, and more.

    Clinical and practical experience is proven, that Ayurveda is able to improve the condition of both Type 2 diabetes and Obesity. Furthermore it is able by its lifestyle guidance and preventive holistic approach, to reduce and avoid follow–up diseases and costs.

    The presentation will show with facts and figures how the wisdom of Ayurveda can be followed for the New Age to prevent, manage and cure such diseases. Figures for savings to the European Health care costs will be presented and discussed.

  • Abstract:

    Can Transcendental Meditation Increase Ojas and Reprogram our Genome and Gene Expression for Longevity?
    Supaya Wenuganen, PhD, USA

    We have begun to explore Ojas level and global gene expression in groups of practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation technique (TM) compared to matched non-practitioner control groups. We determined Ojas level through pulse diagnosis (Nadi Vigyan) in four groups of participants: Young (20-30 years old) TM practitioners, Young Non-TM controls, Older (55-70 years) TM practitioners, and Older Non-TM controls. We measured the global gene expression profile of about 40.000 genes probe from blood cells using the Illumina DNA microarray system, validated the expression of key genes using real-time PCR, and examined for anti-aging effects of TM. Finally, we analyzed the correlations between Ojas level and level of gene expression for specific genes.

    The results of our studies showed that the TM subjects in both the young and the older groups had higher levels of Ojas than their respective controls. Global gene expression results suggested that TM can affect global gene expression in a manner consistent with its many clinical and anti-aging benefits documented in previous research. TM appears to down-regulate genes involved in blood coagulation and the stress response, and to up-regulate genes involved in the immune response and genes involved in mechanisms preventing inflammation.

    A quantitative analysis (using qPCR) of expression of select genes found that AHSP and CXCL10 genes may be biomarkers for a TM effect. The data suggest that AHSP gene expression is regulated through an epigenetic mechanism, while CXCL10 expression may be regulated by genomic reprogramming during long-term TM practice. Two other genes (ITGB5 and SOCS3) appeared to be biomarkers for a TM-induced anti-aging effect. Finally, we found that expression of two genes correlates with Ojas level.

    These findings suggest the TM program can influence Ojas level and can reprogram gene expression to create major benefits for maintaining good health into old age

  • Abstract:

    A simple ama pachana treatment – practical application, clinical results and evaluation through HRV (heart rate variability) measurement
    Dr. med. Wolfgang Schachinger, Austria

    Ama pachana (removal of toxic undigested material) and agni deepana (strengthening of digestive power) are important pillars of ayurvedic treatment.

    This lecture describes a simple, easy to apply 7 day ama pachana treatment that was prescribed 100 fold in daily practice. This treatment consists of herbal compounds, spices, and easy to follow dietary and life style recommendations.

    Clinical cases show that this treatment can be an effective start into a successful ayurvedic therapy when indicated.

    In the analysis through HRV (heart rate variability) signs of higher orderliness and autonomic stability could be found at the end of this 7 day treatment.

  • Abstract:

    Frontiers of Medicine in Ayurveda Dermatology (Psoriasis)
    Dr. Gaurang Joshi, BAMS, India

    Tvak (Skin) is just like a mirror reflection and manifesting various type of inner abnormality or diseased condition. In Ayurveda major skin diseases have been classified under the heading of Kustha. It is interesting to note that the number of cases of skin diseases discarded by the modern medical field being incurable when submit to Ayurveda for cure are reported to get considerable relief and in some cases they get completely relief without any recurrence.

    Psoriasis (EkKustha) is universal in occurrence which affects about 125 million people worldwide. Psoriasis occurs when the immune system mistakes the skin cells as a pathogen, and sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells. Ayurvedic combined modality of the treatment has improved local control in many clinical situations & its most profound impact has definitely been on improving the quality of life with the help of Diet style and Stress Management according to Ayurveda.

  • Abstract:

    The future of Ayurvedic botanicals in the EU
    Robert Verkerk, BSc MSc DIC PhD FACN, UK

    Over 30,000 EU directives and regulations and rapidly escalating EU ‘soft law’ present serious challenges for Ayurveda in Europe. But can these challenges be overcome by the ever-increasing appetite for Ayurveda among Europeans? Will the burgeoning science confirming Ayurveda’s place as among the most relevant approaches to combatting chronic diseases born from Western diets and lifestyles tip the balance? Given the comprehensive failure of the EU Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive in safeguarding Indian systems of medicine, will Ayurvedic food supplements face increasing or decreasing challenges in Europe’s partially harmonised markets? Will Brexit provide more opportunities than threats? In his presentation, these and many more questions will be answered by Dr Robert Verkerk, founder and executive director of Alliance for Natural Health International, who has been at the forefront of protecting Ayurvedic botanicals in the EU over the last 15 years.

  • Abstract:

    Can Ayurveda save the NHS?
    Dr. Donn Brennan, MB BCh BAO, MRCGP, MScAyu, MSCI, Ireland

    Chronic Disease is increasing with an ageing population and with the successes of modern medicine. The increasing burden on the National Health Services is becoming unsustainable. Treatment needs are exceeding resources. Ayurveda has the capacity to greatly reduce this burden on the NHS.

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